Landscape Watering Reminder - July

Our last significant rain was March 1st. With such dry conditions and high temps, even some of the desert plants are looking stressed. Upcoming monsoon clouds and increased humidity will be easier on plants.

Shop for a rain gauge if you don't have one (empty the dust out if you do) as monsoon storms are localized. Turn your irrigation off if you get at least 1/2" of rain. See our tips below to learn about grass removal and rainwater harvesting - both will save you water and money!

Note: These recommendations are a general guideline only and may need to be modified for your specific site conditions.

RECOMMENDATIONS                                                    

Recommendations are for plants that are established in the landscape (in the ground about 2 years).

rainwater into street

Don't make this mistake! Instead of letting rainfall go down the drain, learn how to capture this valuable resource below.

Lawn watering:
Summer grass (Bermuda) - once every 3 days
Overseeded cool season grass (rye)-grass dies out
 
If trees and shrubs are on the same valve:
Desert Adapted - once every 14 days
High Water Use - once every 7 days
 
Tree watering:
Desert Adapted -once every 16 days
High Water Use - once every 8 days
 
Shrub watering:
Desert Adapted - once every 12 days
High Water Use - once every 5 days
 
Groundcover and vine watering:
Desert Adapted - once every 12 days
High Water Use - once every 4 days
 
Cacti and succulent watering - once every 21 days
 
Annual & vegetable watering - once every 2-3 days
  
Reduce your landscape watering 30 to 50 percent by adjusting your irrigation each season. Landscape Watering by the Numbers: A Guide for the Arizona Desert will help you determine how much water to apply and how long to run your system. See the example below Visit the interactive Web version or request a free copy of the booklet at www.wateruseitwisely.com.
 
Bonus tips

  • Converting your grass to Xeriscape in summer is best because it's easiest to kill the grass when it is actively growing. Mesa has resources to help:

    -Find out about our $500 rebate.

    -Check out our Top 10 reasons to take out your grass.

    -Learn more about Xeriscape at our Water - Use It Wisely site.

  • Rainwater is a clean, salt-free source of water that contains many beneficial ingredients for plants. Check out our Top 5 Reasons to Collect Rainwater for Your Landscape.

    - Rain amounts vary greatly across the Valley. So, if you are not sure how much fell in your yard, visit www.rainlog.org to see what your neighborhood weather watchers recorded.

  • High Water Bill? Check out our High Water Use Action Plan!

  • How long should you run your irrigation? Each time you water, be sure to water deeply. About 1-foot for groundcover, 2-feet for shrubs and 3-feet for trees. How long is that? See our landscape watering guide for a quick and easy way to determine your run times. For example, a 2-foot diameter shrub would need about 4 gallons of water each time you water. If you have a 1-gallon per hour emitter on that shrub, your run time would be 4 hours!

  • SMARTSCAPE is a training program for landscape professionals taught by the University of Arizona Cooperative Extension and sponsored by Valley cities including Mesa. The summer class starts August 5 in Gilbert.  Are you looking for a landscaper? A directory of Smartscape Trained professionals is now available.

  • SHADE (Southwest Horticulture Annual Day of Education) is a conference and marketplace for landscape and nursery professionals. It will be held on Aug. 15 at The Renaissance Glendale. Cass Turnbull from Seattle's Plant Amnesty will be just one of the great presenters! Their mission: Working to end the senseless torture and mutilation of trees and shrubs.

     

    To register for monthly watering reminder emails, visit www.Mesaaz.gov and click on Email Alerts located in the right navigation bar. Choose Landscape Watering Reminder, and follow the registration instructions. You can remove your name from the list at any time.

    For more information about Mesa's water conservation programs, visit www.Mesaaz.gov/conservation.

 -H20-