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Conservation

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Mesa's Parks, Recreation and Community Facilities Department is involved with many projects and partnerships in an ongoing effort to promote conservation and involvement with the environment. Check out just a few of the department's activities below: 

 Trail The new Desert Arroyo Park is now open. This beautiful 58-acre parcel of native desert uplands is located at the northeast corner of McKellips and Ellsworth Roads. The park takes full advantage of the site’s natural desert landscape with a passive park focusing on experiencing the native desert.
 Mariposa Park  

Located at 2351 S. Hawes Road, the nine acre Mariposa Park has three nature themed play pockets that children can climb, jump and explore in. There are eight fitness stations that run along the perimeter of the park with two of the stations meeting ADA requirements. The main playground has two play features. All the play equipment promotes children and teens to become physically active through discovery and play.

 mesa-urban-garden-for-web Located in the heart of downtown Mesa, the Mesa Urban Garden is a community organization that provides fresh produce directly to the community and local food banks.
 butterfly-for-web

As part of the Monarch Project, butterfly waystations were recently constructed at the Jefferson & Webster Recreation Centers to promote the population of the endangered Monarch butterfly. Please visit the Jefferson Recreation Center and the Webster Recreation Center for information on other community activities.

Update on the rebound of the Monarch population!

 CM-living-green-for-web A highlight of the spring Celebrate Mesa event, the Living Green Village shares information on sustainability, green ideas and protecting the natural environment.  Visit the Sustainability page for some great ideas and opportunities.
 Tree City Logo Full Color Mesa is recognized as a Tree City USA community. This national program provides the framework for community forestry management for cities and towns across America. Communities achieve Tree City USA status by meeting four core standards of sound urban forestry management: maintaining a tree board or department, having a community tree ordinance, spending at least $2 per capita on urban forestry and celebrating Arbor Day.