Transportation Frequently Asked Questions

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Below are the answers to the questions we are asked most frequently.  Hopefully, you will find the information you need on this page, but if your question isn't listed here or if you need additional information, please contact us.

Do you issue or accept payment for parking tickets?
Where can I renew my driver's license or vehicle tags?
Where can I find out about road construction in Mesa?
How can I report a pothole?
When can I drive on the street after slurry/seal coats?
How do I report a streetlight out?
How do I report a traffic signal light out?
Why are traffic signals timed the way they are?
Why do left turn arrows only seem to work at certain times?
How are pedestrian crosswalks timed?
Why are there cameras on top of some of the traffic signals?
Does Transportation operate red light cameras?
How do I get a traffic signal installed at my intersection?
How do I get a left turn arrow?
How do I get a stop sign at a tee intersection?
How do I reduce speeding in my neighborhood?
How can I request a speed hump or speed cushions?
What is the difference between a speed hump and speed cushions?
What are the advantages and disadvantages of speed humps or cushions?
How can I get a copy of the current bus schedule?
Do you perform car seat safety checks?
What are traffic engineers doing to help older drivers?

 

Do you issue or accept payment for parking tickets?

No, the Transportation Department does not issue or accept payment for parking tickets.  These tickets are issued and processed through the Mesa Police Department or call the main number at 480-255-0072.



Where can I renew my driver's license or vehicle tags?

The City of Mesa Transportation does not issue driver's licenses or vehicle tags. Contact the Arizona Department of Transportation's Motor Vehicle Department or call 602-252-0072.



Where can I find out about road construction in Mesa?

Engineering lists current lane restrictions and capital improvement projects within the City of Mesa. You can also visit the Arizona Department of Transportation or the Maricopa County Department of Transportation.



How can I report a pothole?

You can either submit an online report or call our hotline at 480-644-3038. When reporting a pothole, please let us know your name, phone number and the address or precise location of the pothole.



When can I drive on the street after slurry/seal coats?

You cannot drive on the street until the barricades are removed. They start taking them down at 4:30pm. Once the barricades are removed, you can drive on the street.



How do I report a streetlight out?

You can either submit an online report or call our hotline at 480-644-3191. When reporting a streetlight, please let us know your name, phone number and the address or precise location of the streetlight . Please also note whether the light is out, cycles on and off, or is burning during the day. Currently, the turn-around around time for repairing streetlights is 15 business days from the day it was reported.

 Please note that the City does not repair private lights such as lights in trailer parks, apartment complexes, private parking lots, private sub-Departments, gated communities, or on private property. These lights are usually the responsibility of the owners of the property or are maintained by Salt River Project.

There are some areas in the City that have a City of Mesa mailing address but are not incorporated into the City. The City does not maintain the lights in these areas (examples of these are Dreamland Villa, Leisure World, Thunder Mountain). These lights are private or are maintained by Salt River Project.

In addition, there are also some Special Improvement Districts (agreements between Maricopa County and Salt River Project before these areas were annexed into the City) in the City that have most of their streetlights repaired by Salt River Project. Some examples of these are: Apache Wells, Desert Sands, Arizona Skies, Golden Hills, Fountain of the Sun and Twin Knolls.

For more information on streetlights maintained by SRP, call them at 602-236-8490.  Learn more about City streetlights.



How do I report a traffic signal light out?

You can either submit an online report or call our hotline at 480-644-2160. If possible, please let us know if the entire intersection is dark or just a single indication. For a single indication, please note which color bulb is out and also which direction the traffic signal is facing. Please also be willing to provide your name, phone number and address, in the event the technician needs to contact you with questions.



Why are traffic signals timed the way they are?

Current timing is in place to provide safe and efficient movement of traffic.  Through its central traffic control system, traffic signals are timed to promote progression of traffic along the major streets, thereby reducing overall delay.  One may experience some delays on the minor streets to facilitate the progression on a heavier traversed street.  A significant amount of planning and effort goes into the timing of an intersection. We continue to monitor intersection timings and traffic flow and make adjustments as necessary. For more information on signal timing at a particular intersection, please call Signal Systems 480-644-2160.



Why do left turn arrows only seem to work at certain times?

Left turn arrows only come on when the controller equipment at the intersection recognizes that a vehicle is present. If a vehicle arrives too late to be detected, the intersection may skip the arrow.  Some left turn arrows use third car detection. This means that the left turn arrows operate when three or more vehicles are present in the left turn lane. Sometimes the detection equipment does not pick up a vehicle, or will place a constant call into the controller; if  you would like to report a left turn signal that does not seem to be functioning properly, please call Signal Systems at 480-644-2160.



How are pedestrian crosswalks timed?

The WALK (man), the flashing DON'T WALK (flashing orange hand),  and the steady DON'T WALK (steady orange hand) symbols make up the pedestrian timing.  The WALK signal indicates that it's alright to begin crossing the street.  The flashing DON'T WALK signal indicates that you should not begin to cross the street, but should continue safely across the intersection.  The steady DON'T WALK signal indicates that you should not begin to cross and that you should complete your crossing and get out of the intersection as quickly as possible.

The WALK interval is usually very short, sometimes as brief as six seconds.  The flashing DON'T WALK timing is normally based on the crossing distance of an intersection and a person's average walking speed. 

Not all crosswalks have pedestrian push buttons, but for those that do, the side street will remain green for a longer amount of time if the button is pushed.  Some of Mesa's streets are very wide, so it may take a greater amount of time for a person to cross them.

In addition, some intersections do not have pedestrian push buttons, but do have pedestrian indications.  These locations are set to service the pedestrian every time the concurrent vehicle green indications are active.



Why are there cameras on top of some of the traffic signals?

Cameras are in place at several locations throughout Mesa. Some are used to monitor traffic conditions, while others are used to detect the presence of vehicles at an intersection, thereby providing service and extended green time.  The devices located on top of the traffic signal head, at the end of the mast arm and over the roadway aren't cameras, although most people think they are.  These are fire preemption devices.  Approximately two-thirds of Mesa's traffic signals are equipped with fire preemption. Fire department vehicles have special coded transmitters that trigger the system. This equipment makes the traffic signal give the green indication to the approaching fire vehicle to help emergency services personnel arrive quickly and safely to where they're needed.



Does the Transportation Department operate red light cameras?

The City of Mesa Transportation Department is not responsible for the red light cameras. They are a part of the Mesa Police Department's photo safety program. Any questions should be directed to the Mesa Police Department.



How do I get a traffic signal installed at my intersection?

A study can be requested of the intersection, which involves analyzing data and taking traffic counts. Contact Traffic Studies at 480-644-2160 to request a study.



How do I get a left turn arrow?

A study can be requested of the intersection, which involves analyzing data and taking traffic counts. Contact Traffic Studies at 480-644-2160 to request a study.



How do I get a stop sign at a tee intersection?

Stop signs are not needed to assign the right of way at tee intersections in Arizona.  Arizona state law requires the drivers on the terminating street to yield to drivers on the continuing street.  Stop signs may be installed if a traffic study indicates a stop sign would improve safety.  To request a study of the intersection, contact Traffic Studies at 480-644-2160.



How do I reduce speeding in my neighborhood?

For traditional enforcement, contact the Mesa Police Department at 480-644-3533 or submit a Traffic Enforcement Request Form.  In addition to traditional enforcement, the Police Department offer two community programs to curb neighborhood speeding:  the Speed Trailer and the Block Watch Program. 

For more information on the Neighborhood Watch program, please visit www.mesaaz.gov/police/NeighborhoodWatch/Default.aspx. Speed trailer information can be found at www.mesaaz.gov/police/FAQs/Speeding.aspx.

The Neighborhood Speed Watch Program is a citizen-involved activity in which neighborhood residents collect vehicle and speed information to allow identification of and warnings to be sent to speed limit violators on residential streets. 

The Pace Car Program is an information campaign that encourages participants to "pledge" to drive the speed limit in their neighborhood.  Those who commit are given an "official pace car" window sticker.  Contact Traffic Studies at 480-644-2160 for more information.



How can I request a speed hump or speed cushions?

To be eligible for speed humps or cushions, a street must meet certain conditions.  Three of the key conditions are that the street is not an arterial or major collector, the 85th percentile speed is at least 8 m.p.h. over the speed limit, and a neighborhood survey must confirm at least 70% approval from the affected property owners. At this time, residents requesting speed humps or cushions must pay the cost for speed counts.  A new policy was approved by the City Manager in January 2013. View the speed hump policy (PDF document, 8 pages) and all of the conditions that must be satisfied before speed humps or cushions may be installed on a street.  For more information, contact Traffic Studies at 480-644-2160.

 

What is the difference between a speed hump and speed cushions?

Speed humps span the entire street width. They have a curved profile and a height of 3". Speed cushions are modified speed humps which we use on streets that have been designated as an emergency fire route. They are divided into sections to allow vehicles with a larger wheel base, such as a fire truck or ambulance, to straddle them while having less of an impact on their response time. For more information regarding speed humps and cushions, go to http://www.mesaaz.gov/transportation/speedcontrol.aspx.

 

What are the advantages and disadvantages of speed humps or cushions?
ADVANTAGES DISADVANTAGES 

Significant reduction of travel speeds at or near the devices.  For effective speed reduction, a series of devices is needed along long, straight streets.

Inability to reduce travel speeds to a desired level for the neighborhood.

The devices provide 24-hour, year-round service in an attempt to control high travel speeds along residential streets.

Will increase response times for emergency vehicles into area.  Speed cushions have less of an impact than speed humps, but may still slow emergency vehicles.

May discourage cut-through traffic that is using residential streets due to congested conditions on an adjacent arterial or major collector street.

Traffic diversion may cause increased volumes on other streets within the neighborhood.

Average daily traffic volumes may decrease on residential streets thus reassigning traffic volumes to appropriate street classification usage (collector, arterial).

Increased noise level due to vehicle shifting cargo and acceleration/deceleration at the device.

 

How can I get a copy of the current bus schedule in Mesa?

Visit the Valley Metro web site for a current bus schedule and fare rates.



Do you perform car seat safety checks?

The Transportation Department does not currently perform these checks. The Mesa Fire Department inspects car seats by appointment only, call 480-644-2200 to make an appointment.



What are traffic engineers doing to help older drivers?

The increasing needs of older motorists are becoming apparent as a greater proportion of our nation's motorists fall into the 65 or older age group.  The natural aging process results in a steady decrease in the abilities needed to perform the driving task. 

 

The affect of aging upon vision, hearing, coordination, range of movement, strength, attentiveness, and response time have been well documented through research. Concerns over how these limitations affect motorists has resulted in several research studies that document both these limitations and that (sometimes) make recommendations that could off-set these limitations. 

 

The most recent of these large studies resulted in the January 1998 publication of the Older Driver Highway Design Handbook, by FHWA.  The recommendations found in this handbook were strongly reflected in the Millennium edition of the Manual On Uniform Traffic Control Devices, which became the law of the land for most Cities, Counties and States on January 16, 2001.

 

In addition to new standards in the MUTCD, and as a result of the above referenced handbook and previous research studies, traffic control signs have gotten larger, more legible, incorporate more symbols, and have more reflectivity. 

 

Traffic signal faces have also gotten larger, are better located within fields of view, and longer walking times for pedestrians are becoming common, as are pedestrian refuge islands, and other safer provisions for pedestrians.

 

 

Transportation
300 E. 6th St.
Mesa, AZ 85201

Mailing Address:
City of Mesa
PO Box 1466
Mesa, AZ 85211

Office Hours:
Monday - Thursday
7:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Closed Fridays & Holidays

480-644-2160
480-644-2262 (after hours)

E-mail

MyMesa